In the week before Cities: Skylines came out, a good friend of mine was playing with the terrain builder in this game making an tropical island map. We were all watching her on twitch and since she has a habit of making things beautiful I said that I would play her map first when the game finally came out.

Raerei Cove is a tropical island map and you can download it from the steam workshop. I was eager to build on the map when I got my copy of the game, and the moment she uploaded the map, I grabbed it. I’m interested in seeing how different everyone’s cities are. But here is the evolution of my Eva Resort on the Raerei Cove map.

I started small with a roundabout and a tiny residential district on the edge of the beach cliff. I figured the views would be awesome. Apparently people agreed and moved in.

A single road with a small line of houses. In the distant are fields and an empty roundabout.
You can’t see it now, but those tiny houses are at the top of a large cliff.

Needing a place to work, I spun off a small industrial district. I’m not planning to have much dirty industry as I want this to be a touristy town, but until Foresty and Farming are unlocked, my people needed a place to work. I continued building residential down the hill, the views were, as I predicted, magnificent.

Since there's no day/night cycle the sun is always just about to ... something. This road dead ends and all you see a few palm trees and then the ocean and sun.
So many perfect spots to watch the sunset/rise
Looking up the hill from the beach. Small houses dot the hills, the hilltop is topped with Windmills.
The view is gorgeous in both directions.

Bella Forest was created as Eva Resort reached 1,000 people and became a “worthy village.” I have notice that Forestry seems to clean up industrial pollution quickly and sure enough before too long, the only pollution in my town was sound pollution, the sewage and, I guess, the garbage dump – but I hid that behind a hill.

The garbage dump at the end of a long dirt road, behind a hill, no sign of the city.
Out of sight, out of mind.

The Essential Living district quickly filled up the entire hillside with tiny houses and magnificent views. I’m saving the beach for tourists and parks so once the houses reached the beach, I stopped. I did however get the most adorable overpass created.

Houses line switchback roads from the hill top to the empty beach.
Although it’s more built up now, this is roughly the extent of the residential district.
A small road (part of the switchbacks down the hill) sneaks beneath the larger road mean to be a direct route down the hill.
Overpass! I wasn’t sure if I could get the road to go under the bridge.

Bella Forest was soon not enough for all my residents and I was headed across the lake to what is now KatieKate Forest. Twice as large as Bella Forest, this forest is where the bulk of my industry occurs. It’s also where the bulk of my fires occur since it’s outside the reach of the fire department. With more jobs comes the need for more housing, and with the creeping taint of sewage we were badly in need of more population so we could unlock a treatment plant. Quill’s 18 Neighborhoods was born to hold high density housing on the top of the island. Right now I think there’s only 11 districts, but it’s still expanding.

Overlooking the intersection near the commerical and residential districts. The Corner building is at an angle and is one of my favorite housing units.
Living in the heart of the city. Corner apartments in Quill’s 18 Neighborhood.

Mass transit was required to keep the flow of traffic steady as more and more folks were using the roundabouts and switchbacky roads. The subway was built to bring folks from the bottom of the hill to the commercial district and it sees quite a bit of traffic. From there you can take buses to work or take one up the hill to get home at the end of the day. Sadly the sewage treatment plant did not arrive before the sewage arrived on our pristine beaches, but the pumps have been working overtime to rectify this problem. Once the tourists come, we want those beach parks to be perfect.

The sewage pollution is on the way out now that we have a treatment plant.  The polluted water is receeding!
Getting rid of the source of the pollution.

As Resort Eva continues to grow, expansion is the challenge. Ideally we want a trans-island highway, but right now it’s scheduled to go straight through Bella Forest and I’m struggling to fit it in. Keeping the noise down and the traffic flowing is key. Plus it’ll allow us to build some little farms on the plot of land next door.

District map of the city.
District map of the city. (Pre-pollution control)

Like what you see? Take a look at what others are building on this island.

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